DISTANT LANDS

"The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page." -St. Augustine

We're an independent travel bookstore and outfitters located in the beautiful Pasadena, California. Come check us out!

20 South Raymond Avenue
Old Town Pasadena, California

distantlands.com

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We love going carry-on…but sometimes you can’t. If you hunger for capacity, we’ve got a deal for you! All of our BIG BAGS—luggage that’s bigger than carry-on size —are 20% off, through Sunday, March 9…just in time for those spring break getaways!

Lonely Planet: Great Escapes

Not every trip needs to be a test of human mettle. Sometimes, you just need to get away. Recharge. Think about something out of your routine, or think about nothing at all. In typical Lonely Planet fashion, Great Escapes is a collection of destinations alternately adventurous and serene, challenging and soothing, whose only common denominator is that you don’t have to mount an expedition to go there, nor do you need weeks of vacation time. Explore a new culture, tickle your taste buds, show the kids a good time (or leave them at home for a romantic escape)…whatever you fancy, it’s all here.

National Geographic. Around the world in 125 years

Give your coffee table serious bragging rights.

Nothing conjures up images of exotic places, fascinating cultures and groundbreaking photographs like National Geographic. For their 125th anniversary, National Geographic invited TASCHEN to distill five generations of iconic photographs into this stunning 3-volume collection. With only 125,000 copies available worldwide, this is truly a once-in-a-lifetime book. 

Pre-order now; use coupon code NG125 to save 30% at checkout, through December 7!

8 reasons to encourage you to travel

Do you need an excuse to travel? Here are eight reasons that will make you want to travel (more).



Read more: http://www.thetravelmagazine.net/i-4924—8-reasons-to-encourage-you-to-travel.html#ixzz2lomZITWQ 
Follow us: @TravelMagazine on Twitter | TheTravelMagazine on Facebook

Gift of the Day!

Moleskine journals have been a classic choice for discerning travelers for over a century. Now, anyone can keep a journal worthy of Hemingway or Wilde, with the Passions Travel Journal. Collect and organize your passion for travel:

  • 5 themed sections to fill in
  • 5 tabbed sections to personalize
  • loyalty cards, checklists, calendars, travel information, budget and trip planners, memorable moments and more
  • 202 adhesive labels for personalizing your journal
  • double expandable inner pocket to stash tickets, magazine clippings and other precious ephemera 
240 pages
Embossed cover
5” x 8.25”
Designed in Italy; imported
Make the gift complete with the Moleskine Click Roller Pen!

Maybe it’s the rain and gloom today, but I’m in a British state of mind. Tea instead of coffee this afternoon, even. 

First up is Wordsmiths & Warriors: The English-Language Tourist’s Guide to Britain. It’s partly a travel memoir — the authors really did travel around Britain exploring the places in the book, and they’ve got photos to prove it. It’s partly a very readable history, told from the perspective of the evolution of the English language. As such, it reveals one fascinating tidbit after another, mostly of people in British history who helped the language along. And finally, it’s a very readable (compared to most linguistics texts) account of how the lowly English idiom came to be one of the most widely spoken languages in the world.

Most of the time when you actually visit Britain, you’ll start out in London. For many tourists, this is all they ever see of Britain, or even England. My own opinion (strictly my own) is that London and England are very different places. Although London is in so very many ways the heart of Britain, the focus of so much of its history, it’s such an international city that today it seems more a city of the world, than a city of England. But I’ve only ever been a short-term visitor the London. Craig Taylor’s book, Londoners: The days and nights of London now—as told by those who love it, hate it, live it, left it, and long for it, captures the full panoply of London in a collection of interviews with people from all walks of (London) life. A fascinating insight into this city that belongs, just a little bit, to everyone. 

And finally, a bit of fun. Well, if you didn’t live it, I suppose. Take one guidebook-writing stay-at-home dad, one shoe-loving mom, and two children under the age of 4. Cram them and five months’ worth of necessities into a mid-sized hatchback and drive 8,000 miles around Britain. You’ll have Are We Nearly There Yet?, and you’ll have a very good idea of what the modern English family is like; of the state of tourism in today’s Britain; and a very funny story of a super-sized family road trip that just happens to drive on the left. 

Hi Travelers!

Our Travel Lit Thursday series continues with Volume 2: The Old World.

One of the many benefits of working at Distant Lands is getting to take a peek at all of the books as they come into the store for the first time (or for our first time). Straightening the books every day and making sure everything is in its proper place inevitably leads to book discoveries as well. We’re constantly reading, admiring, and learning. It’s pretty swell. The following three books all caught my eye immediately, whether I unpacked them as they were published, or I found them as hidden treasures on our shelves. 

The Liquid Continent, by Nicholas Woodsworth

I’m not ashamed to say that what caught my eye first was the title. Fortunately, this book is also incredible and as profound (“deep,” if you will) as its name suggests. Using Alexandria, Venice, and Istanbul to explore the idea that the Mediterranean is less a body of water than a continent in its own right, Woodsworth combines history, personal observation, and gorgeous writing. If you’re even remotely interested in the many countries of this “continent” and how they’ve traded, bickered, and broken bread with one another, this book is worth a long, luxurious read.

The Woman Who Fell from the Sky, by Jennifer Steil

You’ve already learned that I’m shallow when it comes to book browsing, so it might make sense that it was the pomegranate and the word “Yemen” that grabbed me. (The vibrant description of a Yemeni wedding in the first few pages sealed the deal.) In Steil’s sometimes funny and always honest depiction of her life running a Yemeni newspaper, she captures the intricacies of expat life and opens a window into a culture most Americans (including me) find completely unfamiliar. For any armchair traveler interested in the enigmatic Middle East or anyone looking for a feisty woman to follow in 333 pages, this is a great one.

Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo, by Tim Parks

Just published, this unusual and lovingly written book explores a country many travelers know, not through the much visited scopes of food and romance, but of something a bit more pragmatic: the mighty train. Writing about the country as he sees it, Parks divides his book into rail journeys. Though he himself is an expat of many years, he presents his getting-to-know of his adopted home in much the same way as visitors would experience it for themselves - one train ride at a time. Totally refreshing, thoughtful, and great for Italophiles.

Welcome to Travel Lit Thursdays!…where every Thursday, the well-traveled staff at Distant Lands share some of their favorite inspirational books about intriguing places around the world.

I love the readable buffet of anthologies. You can read a bit here, a bit there, whenever there’s a spare moment, and if one morsel isn’t to your taste, you move on to another. Best of all, you don’t have to gorge yourself in one sitting to enjoy everything on the table. 

Once Upon a Time There Was a Traveller: Asham Award-winning Stories, edited by Kate Pullinger
There are lots of ways to travel, and the characters in these stories take memorable journeys, both inner and outer. There are writers you know (Angela Carter, Helen Dunmore) and many you many not have, but each story is a lovely, thought-provoking amuse-bouche.

The Torchlight List: Around the World in 200 Books by Jim Flynn
This isn’t an anthology of stories or excerpts, but a syllabus of great literature. Taken as a whole, the books Flynn recommends are a world-class course in human history, culture, politics and civilization. What makes Flynn’s recommendations so compelling and enticing is that he doesn’t just tell you what to read—he tells you why, in concise tidbits of history and literary criticism that are a joy of themselves. 

The Best Women’s Travel Writing, volume 9, edited by Lavinia Spalding
Each year, our customers eagerly await this collection of travel writing, published by Travelers’ Tales. The adventures described here, in places both far and near, show the many ways in which travel is often exhilarating, occasionally terrifying, and always life-changing.

Frustrating, eh? You carefully save up (alright, hoard) those frequent flyer miles, to take that dream vacation. But by the time you clear it with your boss, check the kids’ school schedules and decide where to go…your airline has no more seats to cough up for your hard-earned miles.  Here’s the secret: airline seats go on sale 330 days in advance (roughly 11 months). This is when frequent flyer seats become available for each flight, too. So, if you want to score free seats for a popular destination, get comfy with a calendar, and call or visit the frequent flyer website on the magic day!

Lonely Planet Gives Kids Everything They Ever Wanted to Know


Newly-updated and greatly expanded, Lonely Planet’s “Everything you ever wanted to know” Series is designed expressly for kids. With bite-sized nuggets of information ranging from a primer on the pantheon of Hindu gods to an intimate glimpse at the life of a South American Gaucho, the series aims to spark and entice the interest of the young traveler. Perfect for that long flight or layover(s)!

Lonely Planet Not for Parents Real Wonders of the World
Lonely Planet Not for Parents How to Be a Dinosaur Hunter 
Lonely Planet Not for Parents Asia: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know
Lonely Planet Not for Parents Africa: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know
Lonely Planet Not for Parents Europe: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know
Lonely Planet Not for Parents South America: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know

Treat yourself to 1st Class Rail for less this fall.
20% off First Class TrenitaliaNow through October 28, save 20% on 1st Class tickets on Trenitalia! Offer is limited to the first 200 eligible tickets, so don’t wait—make your appointment too book your Italian train tickets soon.15% off First Class British e-TicketsNow through October 24, enjoy 15% off 1st Class British e-tickets, and see more of England, Wales and Scotland. Offer is limited to the first 900 bookings, so don’t delay!20% off Eurostar Standard PremierEnjoy 20% discount on Eurostar Standard Premier (Comfort Class) tickets for travel between London and Paris or Brussels. These comfortable and spacious seats seamlessly pair a modern transportation marvel with extraordinary service. Amazing! Just book by October 24, 2013. Valid for travel from October 15, 2013 to February 14, 2014, Monday to Thursday between 8:30 am and 4:00 pm and anytime from Friday to Sunday. Not available for travel from October 25 to November 4, 2013 and from December 20, 2013 to January 6, 2014.20% off Eurail Italy PassBook a Eurail Italy pass through October 30, and save 20%! Valid on both 1st and 2nd class passes, valid from 3 - 10 travel days. Pack Your Lederhosen - 20% off German Rail Pass…and more!For a limited time, not only will you save 20% on select German Rail Passes, you’ll also get 20% off select Bavarian castles, and 15% off Zugspitzbahn, the highest railway in Germany. Deal valid on 7, 8, 9, or 10 days within 1 month passes. Book through December 5, 2013 for travel through January 31, 2014. Swiss Sale: 5 Days for the Price of 4Buy either a 5-Day 1st Class Swiss Pass or 5-Day 1st Class Swiss Saver Pass for the price of 4 days. Purchase through December 20, for travel between November 1 - December 31, 2013. With so many great LIMITED TIME specials, come in soon for your fall rail tickets and passes! Call Susan at (626) 449-3220, or email susan@distantlands.com.

Treat yourself to 1st Class Rail for less this fall.

20% off First Class Trenitalia
Now through October 28, save 20% on 1st Class tickets on Trenitalia! Offer is limited to the first 200 eligible tickets, so don’t wait—make your appointment too book your Italian train tickets soon.

15% off First Class British e-Tickets
Now through October 24, enjoy 15% off 1st Class British e-tickets, and see more of England, Wales and Scotland. Offer is limited to the first 900 bookings, so don’t delay!

20% off Eurostar Standard Premier
Enjoy 20% discount on Eurostar Standard Premier (Comfort Class) tickets for travel between London and Paris or Brussels. These comfortable and spacious seats seamlessly pair a modern transportation marvel with extraordinary service. Amazing! Just book by October 24, 2013. Valid for travel from October 15, 2013 to February 14, 2014, Monday to Thursday between 8:30 am and 4:00 pm and anytime from Friday to Sunday. Not available for travel from October 25 to November 4, 2013 and from December 20, 2013 to January 6, 2014.

20% off Eurail Italy Pass
Book a Eurail Italy pass through October 30, and save 20%! Valid on both 1st and 2nd class passes, valid from 3 - 10 travel days. 

Pack Your Lederhosen - 20% off German Rail Pass…and more!
For a limited time, not only will you save 20% on select German Rail Passes, you’ll also get 20% off select Bavarian castles, and 15% off Zugspitzbahn, the highest railway in Germany. Deal valid on 7, 8, 9, or 10 days within 1 month passes. Book through December 5, 2013 for travel through January 31, 2014. 

Swiss Sale: 5 Days for the Price of 4
Buy either a 5-Day 1st Class Swiss Pass or 5-Day 1st Class Swiss Saver Pass for the price of 4 days. Purchase through December 20, for travel between November 1 - December 31, 2013. 

With so many great LIMITED TIME specials, come in soon for your fall rail tickets and passes! Call Susan at (626) 449-3220, or email susan@distantlands.com.

Lonely Planet Makes Southeastern Europe a lot less Lonely
Tired of tiramisu? Had enough with eclairs? Ready to say so long to sangria? Lonely Planet hears your pain and holds up its newest guide to oft-overlooked Southeastern Europe. The guide covers Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, and Turkey. At prices that would make them blush in Burgundy, the Balkans is an affordable corner of Europe brimming with history and a diversity of landscapes from the storied beaches of Croatia to the faded glamor of Bucharest.

Lonely Planet Makes Southeastern Europe a lot less Lonely

Tired of tiramisu? Had enough with eclairs? Ready to say so long to sangria? Lonely Planet hears your pain and holds up its newest guide to oft-overlooked Southeastern Europe. The guide covers Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, and Turkey. At prices that would make them blush in Burgundy, the Balkans is an affordable corner of Europe brimming with history and a diversity of landscapes from the storied beaches of Croatia to the faded glamor of Bucharest.

When it was time to leave Vernal, we had to decide which side of the “Dinosaur Diamond” to travel — west and south through Price (near the Cleveland Lloyd Quarry), or east and south through Colorado, which would take us near Fruita, home of the Dinosaur Journey Museum. 

West it was. Our first stop was Dinosaur, Colorado, which is pretty much a blip on the map, but it boasts a lovely and friendly Colorado Welcome Center, and the excellent Bedrock Depot. It’s also the closest gateway to the Colorado side of Dinosaur National Monument, but seems really short on hotel space! At any rate, we were headed south, along Highway 64. Our route took us through hills covered with scrubby trees, to a lunar landscape notable for its extraordinary amount of electrical lines! Finally, we wound our way up and down Douglas Pass, and on into Fruita.

Fruita is a pleasant farm town, with an interesting town center, and it’s the Colorado counterpart of Moab, Utah, as a mountain-biking center. In fact, there’s a mountain bike trail from Fruita to Moab, should you be up for a 100+ mile mountain bike trip! But our goal was Dinosaur Journey, operated by the Museum of Western Colorado. 

Dinosaur Journey is a fairly small museum, but well curated, with a focus on locally-found fossils, geology, and more. A few complete mounted skeletons are joined by many bone specimens, some of them pretty spectacular (a Supersaurus shoulder blade dwarfs adult humans), and some animatronic dinos that help visitors imagine what it might have been like to encounter the creatures. Alas, we ran out of time to see the movie, as we were off to Moab, Utah—and some real life adventures.

When you have an 8-year-old who’s memorized the contents of 3 dinosaur encyclopedias, Dinosaur National Monument is a must-see attraction. The Monument straddles the Utah-Colorado border, but the main attraction—the Quarry Wall—is on the Utah side, an easy half hour or so drive from Vernal.

As you drive in, the most noticeable feature is the Green River, which flows through the heart of the Utah section of the monument. From the Visitor Center, a tram winds into the hills to the reason for the Monument’s existence. In 1909, paleontologist Earl Douglass stumbled across a string of vertebrae poking out from the ground. His excavations led him to a massive collection of dinosaur fossils, which became the Carnegie Quarry. After being closed for several years because of building instability, the Quarry Wall is reopened. It’s truly stupendous to see such a massive and diverse collection of ancient bones still fossilized in the ground—especially when you look at the graphic showing the original extent of the quarry. As large as it is, what’s left today is a fraction of the original site.

After giving the fossils their due, we continued along to see what else the Monument has to offer. In many places, you can see petroglyphs created by the Fremont People, which are remarkably accessible from the road. Our self-guided auto tour pointed out a few of those places, and gave a concise explanation of the area’s unique geology, carved by the Green River. Today, the Green is a magnet for rafting and floating trips in the area.

The Monument features more recent history, as well. In the late 19th and early 20th century, a few brave families settled homesteads in the area. One family still has a ranch surrounded by the Monument’s lands, but perhaps the most fascinating story is that of Josie Bassett Morris. In 1913, Josie homesteaded the property where she lived until 1964, when she died of complications from a broken hip. During most of that time, she lived alone in her cabin, farming and ranching, and exemplifying the pioneer spirit. Today, her cabin and some of her outbuildings still stand. We were astonished to see that her grapevines are still thriving, and her irrigation system is still working.

Next up: a trip through Colorado on our way to Moab, Utah…

Our most popular sleep mask, feeling the love from Good Housekeeping! (Our customers love the light weight, the fun colors, and the way it totally blocks out light, but still lets you blink…) Now, go to sleep!

Good Housekeeping Rated Bucky 40 Blinks Sleep Mask #1 (by Shannon Peters)